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ONLINE COVER Microrobots Make Big Steps Toward Autonomy. Existing microrobots are generally limited to external control through magnetic fields or light. Microrobots that are able to integrate control, power, and sensing internally (or onboard) are expected to achieve greater autonomy than their externally controlled counterparts. Reynolds et al. have built microscopic robots controlled by onboard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics. These microrobots are powered by light and use onboard computers to execute pre-programmed motions. This month’s cover is a false-color scanning electron microscope image of microscopic robots before release.

Credit: Qingkun Liu/McEuen and Cohen Labs/Cornell University

Science Robotics

  • Volume 7|
  • Issue 70|
  • Sep 2022

ONLINE COVER Microrobots Make Big Steps Toward Autonomy. Existing microrobots are generally limited to external control through magnetic fields or light. Microrobots that are able to integrate control, power, and sensing internally (or onboard) are expected to achieve greater autonomy than their externally controlled counterparts. Reynolds et al. have built microscopic robots controlled by onboard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics. These microrobots are powered by light and use onboard computers to execute pre-programmed motions. This month’s cover is a false-color scanning electron microscope image of microscopic robots before release.

Credit: Qingkun Liu/McEuen and Cohen Labs/Cornell University

Focus

    BY
    • Dengning Xia
    • Amy J. Wood-Yang
    • Mark R. Prausnitz
  • NO ACCESS
Ingestible devices have the potential to clear away barriers to oral delivery of biologics to improve drug bioavailability.
    BY
    • Robin R. Murphy
  • NO ACCESS
Disney’s Baymax! series may be science fiction but soft robotics is real.

Research Articles

    BY
    • Fangyu Zhang
    • Zhengxing Li
    • Yaou Duan
    • Amal Abbas
    • Rodolfo Mundaca-Uribe
    • Lu Yin
    • Hao Luan
    • Weiwei Gao
    • Ronnie H. Fang
    • Liangfang Zhang
    • Joseph Wang
  • NO ACCESS
Green algae, embedded in a capsule, has been utilized as an active motor for oral drug delivery to the gastrointestinal tract.
    BY
    • Shriya S. Srinivasan
    • Amro Alshareef
    • Alexandria V. Hwang
    • Ziliang Kang
    • Johannes Kuosmanen
    • Keiko Ishida
    • Joshua Jenkins
    • Sabrina Liu
    • Wiam Abdalla Mohammed Madani
    • Jochen Lennerz
    • Alison Hayward
    • Josh Morimoto
    • Nina Fitzgerald
    • Robert Langer
    • Giovanni Traverso
  • Free
An ingestible capsule was designed to robotically clear intestinal mucus in order to heighten drug absorption.
    BY
    • Michael F. Reynolds
    • Alejandro J. Cortese
    • Qingkun Liu
    • Zhangqi Zheng
    • Wei Wang
    • Samantha L. Norris
    • Sunwoo Lee
    • Marc Z. Miskin
    • Alyosha C. Molnar
    • Itai Cohen
    • Paul L. McEuen
  • Free
Microscopic robots controlled by onboard integrated circuits that walk when powered by light are realized.

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