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ONLINE COVER A Model of Oneself. Robots, like humans and animals, require self-models to be able to anticipate and plan future actions. Chen et al. developed a method that enables a robot arm to model its morphology and kinematics using an approach based on query-driven visual self-modeling. This month’s cover is a multiple-exposure image of a self-modeled robot arm touching a small red sphere while avoiding a large red cube.

Credit: Columbia Engineering

Science Robotics

  • Volume 7|
  • Issue 68|
  • Jul 2022

ONLINE COVER A Model of Oneself. Robots, like humans and animals, require self-models to be able to anticipate and plan future actions. Chen et al. developed a method that enables a robot arm to model its morphology and kinematics using an approach based on query-driven visual self-modeling. This month’s cover is a multiple-exposure image of a self-modeled robot arm touching a small red sphere while avoiding a large red cube.

Credit: Columbia Engineering

Editorial

To build better machines, roboticists need to ask the right questions.

Focus

  • BY
    • Tom Ziemke
    • Sam Thellman
  • NO ACCESS
Behavioral variability can be used to make robots more human-like, but we propose that it may be wiser to make them less so.
Roboticists are working on real-world versions of Sox, a robot companion in Lightyear, to play therapeutic roles.

Research Articles

  • BY
    • Luyao Yuan
    • Xiaofeng Gao
    • Zilong Zheng
    • Mark Edmonds
    • Ying Nian Wu
    • Federico Rossano
    • Hongjing Lu
    • Yixin Zhu
    • Song-Chun Zhu
  • NO ACCESS
An explainable artificial intelligence collaboration framework enables in situ bidirectional human-robot value alignment.
  • BY
    • Boyuan Chen
    • Robert Kwiatkowski
    • Carl Vondrick
    • Hod Lipson
  • NO ACCESS
A robot can learn full-body morphology via visual self-modeling to adapt to multiple motion planning and control tasks.
  • BY
    • Corrado De Pascali
    • Giovanna Adele Naselli
    • Stefano Palagi
    • Rob B. N. Scharff
    • Barbara Mazzolai
  • NO ACCESS
Pneumatic actuators that contract and elongate can be scaled, tuned in force, and arranged in biomimetic configurations.
Human-like temporal variability in movements is a powerful hint that humans use to ascribe humanness to robots.

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